Understanding Horse Feed Tags

Every bag of commercial horse feed has a feed tag attached.  A few companies print their feed tag information directly onto the bag.  This information can be both extremely useful as well as misleading. Feed tags are largely misunderstood by consumers and this article should help provide some insight into what a feed tag tells us as well as what it does not. The Role Read more…

Lysine: Small Number Big Impact

Historically, concentrated horse feeds were referred to by two numbers; protein and fat.  This feed is a “12-6” and that feed is a “14-3”.  These numbers represent the percentages of weight for protein and fat as minimum values of the guaranteed analysis on the feed tag. These are very important values when choosing a feed for your horse.  I would also add fiber as a Read more…

black magnifying glass on white and brown marble table

Supplements in Horse Feed: Deal or No Deal?

As horse feed formulations become more advanced the race to provide a competitive edge keeps heating up.  How many “best” feeds are there room for in a crowded market? The major brands design and produce feeds that deliver exceptional performance in nutrition making it difficult for smaller competitors to make a case for choosing them over the brand leaders.  This leaves marketing departments with only Read more…

white horse on brown dried grass field during daytime

Buying Hay for Horses

Here we are in May again and it’s the beginning of another hay season.  Hay season has a special meaning to horse keepers.  It is a time of anxiety and frustration since hay is typically the largest expense in the operating budget of the farm. Many variables set the quality, quantity and type of hay that is available to us as horse keepers.  Weather is Read more…

Feeding The Metabolic Horse

This is a subject that is close to my heart since Flair fought bouts of laminitis and abscesses for 16 months from August 2016 to December 2017 so I had a crash course in equine nutrition for horses suffering from metabolic conditions. The bad news about EMS is that there are few reliable tests and very subtle warning signs that your horse may be suffering Read more…

Supplementing Forage Diets for Horses

There is no better core diet for horses than forage in all its forms. Pasture, grass hay, legume hay and forage replacements like beet pulp are an essential part of a healthy diet for our equine friends. Without a doubt the large majority, at least 80%, of what a horse eats should be forage. What type of forage and quantity will be subjects for future Read more…

brown dried grass in close up photography

Hay 101

Since I keep emphasizing the importance of forage in the equine diet I thought it was time to post a little something about it.  I want to apologize for the length of this piece and I considered breaking it up into a couple of different posts but everything is interconnected. Before I entered the wonderful (??) world of horses I never gave much thought to Read more…

The Myth of “Fixed Ingredients Feeds”

Are “fixed ingredients feeds” really fixed ingredients? If they are is it really the best choice? I’d like to remind everyone that in the world of horse feed there are very few regulations regarding statements of quality or efficacy so it is difficult to call out the claims of manufacturers. What is meant by “Fixed ingredients”? “Fixed Ingredients” is a marketing term that implies a Read more…